Kerr Hall
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Events
Friday, February 22, 2019 | 12 – 1:30pmKerr Hall
Political Science Lecture: Gabriel Lenz

Gabriel Lenz
Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

Gabriel Lenz's research focuses on voters’ ability to control their elected officials. His aim is to further our understanding of when voters succeed in holding politicians accountable, when they fail, and how to help them avoid failures. Drawing on insights from social psychology and economics, his research and teaching interests are in the areas of elections, public opinion, political psychology, and political economy. Although specializing in American democracy, Lenz also conducts research on Canada, the U.K., Mexico, Netherlands, and Brazil. He has ongoing projects about improving voters' assessments of the performance of politicians, reducing the role of candidate appearance in elections, and measuring political corruption.

Friday, April 12, 2019 | 3 – 4:30pmKerr Hall
Sinopoli Memorial Lecture: "Dangerous Minds in Dangerous Times"

Ronald Beiner, a professor of political science at the University of Toronto and the author of Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right, re-examines works of mainstream philosophy and political theory that have been embraced by contemporary "alt-right" intellectuals. He asks: "Don’t we need to start giving serious attention to how some of our favorite authors are being read by the far right, rather than naively assuming that they are essentially resources for progressive and egalitarian politics?"

Beiner is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. His other books include Political Judgment; What's the Matter with Liberalism?; Philosophy in a Time of Lost Spirit; Liberalism, Nationalism, Citizenship; Civil Religion; and Political Philosophy: What It Is and Why It Matters

Friday, June 7, 2019 | 12 – 1:30pmKerr Hall
Political Science Lecture: Michael Ting

Michael M. Ting
Professor of International & Public Affairs and Political Science
Columbia University

Michael M. Ting specializes in American politics and formal models of political institutions, with a focus on bureaucracy, elections and legislatures. Some of his recent projects are on primary elections, federalism, bureaucratic politics, and the quality of governance. He is also an author of A Behavioral Theory of Elections (Princeton Press, 2011) with Jonathan Bendor, Daniel Diermeier and David Siegel. His current projects include the development of government personnel systems and organizational turf wars.

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