Sproul Hall
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Events
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 | 4:15 – 5:45pmSproul Hall
"Working Women in 13th-Century Japan: A Noblewoman's Guide to Career Success"

Speaker: Christina Laffin, associate professor and the Canada Research Chair in Premodern Japanese Literature and Culture, University of British Columbia. Her talk starts with a woman in Kyoto who received a request from her only daughter in 1264: What teachings can you send me for my life at court? The mother produced a letter brushed with more than 600 lines of instructions on how to succeed in life and in work. This presentation will trace some of the advice contained in Abutsu’s Letter (Abutsu no fumi) and consider what it reveals about elite medieval Japanese women.
 

Thursday, May 23, 2019 | 12 – 1:30pmSproul Hall
Lecture: "The Narrative Tradition of Exile to the Maghrib and the Origins of the Religious Refugee"

Camilo Gomez-Rivas is associate professor of Mediterranean Studies in the Department of Literature at UC Santa Cruz. His first book described the emergence and evolution of Islamic legal networks and institutions in medieval Morocco under the first Berber Islamic empire. He is currently writing a short history of the Almoravids and a book on the origins of the religious refugee in the medieval western Mediterranean.

Professor Gomez-Rivas will discuss how 12th-century exiles to the Maghrib began to lay down a path to exile and integration into the religious and political communities of the Maghrib, This resulted in their incorporation into a Maghribi historiography in which certain exile and refugee communities play significant cultural and political roles. That dynamic is mirrored in a similar process of narrative accumulation in the legal tradition; this resulted in the formation of an idea of a legal-political community that encompasses extraterritorial members and those ultimately displaced into the Maghrib in the religious wars of the late medieval period. This Comparative Literature Colloquium talk will describe the evolution of these intertwined processes.

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