King Hall
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Events
Wednesday, October 5, 2022 | 12:10 – 1pmKing Hall

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Downes v. Bidwell, 182 U.S. 244 (1901), is known as one of the most important of the Insular Cases. In Downes, the Supreme Court held that although Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory that belongs to the United States, it is nevertheless not part of the “United States.” As such, not all parts of the Constitution apply to Puerto Rico.  
 
Downes
unabashedly relied on racist views to justify its holding. Specifically, the Supreme Court referred to the people of Puerto Rico as an “alien race[ ], differing from us in religion, customs, laws, methods of taxation, and modes of thought,” such that “the administration of government and justice, according to Anglo-Saxon principles, may for a time be impossible.”  
 
Using the growing methodology of rewriting Supreme Court opinions to better understand the relationship between constitutional law jurisprudence and racial injustice, this Essay examines what a rewritten Downes v. Bidwell could look like. Part I discusses themes from the original opinion that facilitated racial injustice. Part II examines the contemporary implications of Downes and the Insular Cases. Part III highlights themes that a rewritten opinion may deploy. Finally, the Essay concludes with a rewritten Downes v. Bidwell.  

Please contact Onell Berrios at oaberrios@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

Friday, October 14, 2022 | 8:45am – 4:45pmKing Hall
Symposium: Economics and Politics of Refugee Integration

"Lessons Learned and Ways Forward for the Economics and Politics of Refugee Integration"

This daylong symposium brings together professors of economics, law, political science and anthropology with human rights advocates to examine 1) efforts by countries to integrate refugees into their economies and 2) racialized policies in other nations in order to stop refugees from crossing their borders.

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Wednesday, October 26, 2022 | 12:10 – 1pmKing Hall

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"The Power and Persistence of Racism"

Deborah N. Archer is a Professor of Clinical Law and Co-Faculty Director of the Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at NYU School of Law. During this discussion Professor Archer will broadly address racial justice, touching on housing, voting rights, and criminal legal system reform.

Please contact Onell Berrios at oaberrios@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

Wednesday, November 30, 2022 | 12:10 – 1pmKing Hall

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"Building a Culture of Ethical Inclusion"

Corporate firms have long expressed their support of the notion that their organizations should become more demographically diverse, while creating a culture that is inclusive of all members of the firm. These firms have traditionally, however, not been successful at improving demographic diversity and true inclusion within the upper echelons of their organizations. The reality that firms’ statements failed to live up to their realities, however, was upended after the #MeToo Movement of 2017 and 2018, which was followed by corporate support of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement in 2020. These two social movements, while distinct in many ways, forced firms to rethink how to approach the status of women and people of color within their organizations. It forced them to ask, yet again, but with renewed energy: “What is the best way to improve diversity and inclusion within firms?” I argue that in addition to pursuing the Business and Legal Cases for diversity when crafting diversity, equity, and inclusion (“DEI”) programs, firms should also employ the “Ethics Case,” which is necessary for creating a truly inclusive organizational culture.

Veronica Root Martinez joined the Duke Law faculty in 2022 from Notre Dame Law School, where she was a professor of law, the Robert & Marion Short Scholar, and director of the Program on Ethics, Compliance & Inclusion.

Martinez teaches Securities Litigation, Enforcement, & Compliance; Corporate Compliance & Ethics; Global Compliance Survey; Professional Responsibility; and Contracts. Her greatest professional joy is when her Contracts students begin to analyze cases like lawyers.

Please contact Onell Berrios at oaberrios@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

Wednesday, March 1, 2023 | 12:10 – 1pmKing Hall

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More information to follow. Please contact Onell Berrios at oaberrios@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

Wednesday, March 22, 2023 | 12:10 – 1pmKing Hall

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More information to follow. Please contact Onell Berrios at oaberrios@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

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