Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts
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Events
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 | 7 – 9:30pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
UC Davis Concert Band

Pete Nowlen, director

Program TBA.

Mondavi Center
$10 Students and Children, $20 Adults (Open Seating)

Saturday, December 9, 2017 | 7 – 9pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Haydn: "The Creation"

University Chorus with the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra
Jeffrey Thomas, conductor

Soprano [the angel Gabriel, Eve]

Tenor [the angel Uriel]

Baritone [the angel Raphael, Adam]

Haydn: The Creation (Die Schopfung)
Text by an anonymous English poet and Baron Gottfried van Swieten, after the book of Genesis from the Old Testament and Milton’s Paradise Lost.

"The work many consider Haydn’s masterpiece is a direct descendant of Handelian oratorio. From his earliest days in England, Haydn admired the great Handel oratorios; above all Israel in Egypt—with its frogs, flies, and hailstorms—influenced Haydn as he worked on The Creation. It had long been the impresario Salomon’s plan to induce him to compose an oratorio for the English, and it was Salomon who brought Haydn the libretto, which had, in fact, originally been intended for Handel himself.

For each day of the week of creation, the English libretto suggested biblical recitative, commentary based on Milton, and a concluding chorus paraphrasing one of the psalms. Haydn carried the English text back to Austria, where he asked Baron Gottfried van Swieten to provide a German version. This was a good choice: Swieten, a former ambassador to Berlin and the keeper of the Imperial Library, was an enthusiastic promoter of Baroque music, and thus knew the territory well. He followed the English plan closely, and as he went along, suggested to Haydn in the margin of his manuscript the sort of music he thought would be most appropriate. (“Because of the last three lines,” he wrote of the aria, no. 16, “only the joyful twittering, not the long held tones, of the nightingale can be imitated here.”) Swieten cut and altered his English source—though always leaving the King James biblical citation untouched—to fashion an English text that for the most part sits comfortably alongside his German.

Die Schopfung / The Creation is, then, for all intents and purposes bilingual. (This is trickier than it looks: if one is to write, as Haydn did, worm music, the English “worm” and German “Wurm” must fall in the same place, despite the grammatical differences between the two languages.) The English we use today was spruced up by Vincent Novello when the vocal score was published, but is still thick with Miltonian allusions.

Haydn excelled at word painting, such that the illustrative devices are apt to seize your attention early on. They begin subtly in the wondrous first bars of the overture, called by Haydn “Representation of Chaos,” where life seems to stir for the first time with the bassoon arpeggio. At the word “light” of “And there was light” (No. 2), there blossoms an enormous C major from the full performing force. From there, you will doubtless note, among others: the boisterous sea (No.  7); the “cheerful host of birds” and “th’ immense Leviathan” (No. 19); and of course the tawny lion, flexible tiger, nimble stag, and noble steed of No. 22. Likewise, the choice of keys, instruments, and harmonic events is often dictated by the particulars of the text.

Creating a work of such dimensions drove Haydn, for once, to the limits of his legendary stamina. “I fell daily to my knees and asked God for strength to finish it,” he said. He struggled through the first performance: “Sometimes my whole body was ice cold, sometimes a burning heat overcame me, and more than once I was afraid that I would suddenly have a stroke.” Yet the magnitude of the achievement was clear to everybody. “For the life of me,” wrote one listener after the 1799 public premiere, “I wouldn’t have believed that human lungs and sheep gut and calf’s skin could create such miracles.”

  —D. Kern Holoman, professor emeritus

Friday, December 15, 2017 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
The Mark Wood Experience Holiday Extravaganza

Mark Wood, original member and string master with the internationally acclaimed Trans-Siberian Orchestra,  performs alongside the Davis Senior High School Symphony Orchestra and Davis High Honor Choir (Angelo Moreno, Director) to create holiday magic with The Mark Wood Experience Holiday Extravaganza!

Mark Wood brings a wealth of exciting experience and passion from his many years of performing around the world as the premier rock violinist of his generation, and will be dedicating the concert to the memory of TSO founder Paul O’Neill and the band’s bass player David Z; both of whom passed away in 2017.

Joining Mark Wood is his wife Laura Kaye and son Elijah Wood, making this a concert for the whole family. With songs like "Wizards in Winter," "Carol of the Bells" and "O Holy Night," who wouldn’t get in the holiday spirit?

The program will include some of the biggest hits from Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Led Zeppelin, Michael Jackson, as well as Mark’s original material.

Saturday, December 16, 2017 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Brandi Carlile

Winter Acoustic Tour
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
Brandi Carlile and her indispensable collaborators, Tim and Phil Hanseroth, a.k.a. The Twins, have always offered listeners both control and abandon, often within a single song. The most well-known Brandi Carlile tunes, 2007’s “The Story” and 2012’s “That Wasn’t Me,” are dynamic journeys in themselves, encompassing myriad emotions and varied stylistic touches. The Firewatcher’s Daughter, her latest release, marks a triumphant return after a three-year recording hiatus, and her strongest, most rock & roll album to date.

Sunday, January 7, 2018 | 2 – 4pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Alexander String Quartet: The Triangle

Schumann String Quartet in A Major, op. 41, no. 3 (1842)

Brahms String Quartet No. 2 in A Minor, op. 51, no. 2 (1873)

Theirs was one of the great love triangles, one that has been memorialized in music, novels, and even in a movie. At the time Johannes Brahms met Clara Schumann (née Wieck) and Robert Schumann in October of 1853, he was 20 years old; Clara was 34 and Robert 43 years old. In different ways and for different reasons these three great musicians fell in love with each other, a love that was complicated beyond measure by the madness that would overtake Robert just four months after they met and that would take his life 29 months later. This series will observe this extraordinary love triangle through the lens of their equally extraordinary chamber music.

Renowned musicologist, author and composer Robert Greenberg provides commentary throughout this concert.

Sunday, January 7, 2018 | 7 – 9pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Alexander String Quartet: The Triangle

Schumann String Quartet in A Major, op. 41, no. 3 (1842)

Brahms String Quartet No. 2 in A Minor, op. 51, no. 2 (1873)

Theirs was one of the great love triangles, one that has been memorialized in music, novels, and even in a movie. At the time Johannes Brahms met Clara Schumann (née Wieck) and Robert Schumann in October of 1853, he was 20 years old; Clara was 34 and Robert 43 years old. In different ways and for different reasons these three great musicians fell in love with each other, a love that was complicated beyond measure by the madness that would overtake Robert just four months after they met and that would take his life 29 months later. This series will observe this extraordinary love triangle through the lens of their equally extraordinary chamber music.

The quartet performs this program without intermission.

Q&A Session
Sunday, Jan 7 - Vanderhoef Studio Theatre - Post-Performance
Alexander String Quartet

Wednesday, January 17, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
St. Louis Symphony Orchestra

David Robertson, music director | Augustin Hadelich, violin
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
David Robertson joins the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra on his farewell tour as its music director. For the orchestra’s third Jackson Hall appearance it will perform Shostakovich’s First Symphony (written at age 18) in addition to Britten’s haunting Violin Concerto, as played by Mondavi Center favorite Augustin Hadelich.

Adès: Dances from Powder Her Face

Britten: Violin Concerto

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 1

Pre-Performance Talk
Wednesday, Jan 17 - Jackson Hall - 7pm
St Louis Symphony Orchestra
Speaker: David Robertson, Music Director in conversation with Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

Thursday, January 18, 2018 | 4 – 5pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: "Revision/s"

David Robertson, music director

Works for chamber orchestra written by Revision/s Festival composer fellows Jenny Beck and Lily Chen, and UC Davis graduate students Phil Acimovic and Chris Castro.

Founded in 1880, the St. Louis Symphony is recognized internationally as an ensemble of the highest caliber, performing a broad musical repertoire with skill and spirit. The symphony continues to build upon its reputation for musical excellence while maintaining its commitment to local education and community activities.

A consummate musician, masterful programmer and dynamic presence, David Robertson has established himself as one of today’s most sought-after American conductors. A passionate and compelling communicator with an extensive orchestral and operatic repertoire, he has forged close relationships with major orchestras around the world through his exhilarating music-making and stimulating ideas.

Saturday, January 20, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Lara Downes

Mondavi Center Presenting Program
Pianist Lara Downes performs a special concert in commemoration of the 2018 Leonard Bernstein centennial (one of three events honoring Bernstein this season), playing songs from her most recent recording project Anniversaries for Lenny. By pairing Bernstein’s complete Anniversaries for Piano with a group of newly commissioned “Anniversaries” from prominent composers who are profoundly connected to his body of work, Downes’ program is a uniquely personal tribute to Bernstein.

Friday, January 26, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Circa

Il Ritorno
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
Australia’s Circa has always created work at the crossroads of cirque and modern dance. But never has the company so fully embraced that potential as in Il Ritorno. This evening-length work is steeped in the movement vocabulary of cirque, but pushes that language to stunning new emotional and psychological ends. Accompanied by a string quartet and two singers performing excerpts of Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria, seven dancers strive to connect with each other against a stark black wall, precariously lifting, holding, levitating and falling, their movements driven by the forces of desire, devastation and absence.

A powerful vision of humanity and compassion…a luminous new work.

—The Australian

Q&A Session
Friday, Jan 26 - Jackson Hall - Post-Performance
Circa: Il Ritorno
Moderator: Ruth Rosenberg

Saturday, January 27, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Charles Dutoit, conductor Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
The ever-expressive Charles Dutoit conducts the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra through a largely Romantic program, one topped off with Stravinsky’s bracing 1911 version of Petrushka. Pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet returns to tackle Liszt’s lyrical, masterfully constructed second piano concerto.

Respighi: Fountains of Rome

Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2

Stravinsky: Petrushka (1911)

Uncorked Event  An Uncorked Event, featuring wines from Grgich Hills Estate.

Sunday, January 28, 2018 | 3 – 5pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Carnival of the Animals

Feathers, fur and fins—oh my! Circa’s fanciful production features creatures of both land and sea, who tumble, fly, leap and spin their way through the many wondrous worlds of the animal kingdom. Inspired by Camille Saint-Saëns’ beloved musical suite, Carnival of the Animals whisks audiences away on a thrilling circus escapade through the talents of seven acrobats, two singers, four musicians and delightful animations that bring to life juggling zebras, street-smart elephants and somersaulting kangaroos.

Saturday, February 3, 2018 | 2 – 4pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Living Earth Show: "Revision/s"

Christian Baldini, music director and conductor

Works by Sir Edward Elgar—

Introduction and Allegro
Jolán Friedhoff and Dagenais Smiley, violin
Ellen Ruth Rose, viola, and Susan Lamb Cook, cello

Variations on an Original Theme (“Enigma”), op. 36

For string quartet and string orchestra only, Introduction and Allegro is evocative of a Baroque concerto grosso with demanding, soloistic parts playing with and against a full-sounding string orchestra. The work was composed for a concert of the London Symphony Orchestra in 1905, then in its infancy. The piece is meant to showcase the string-players abilities of the orchestra, and the Allegro section features, in Elgar’s words, a “devil of a fugue.”

Elgar wrote of the Enigma Variations: “Its dark saying must be left unguessed, and I warn you that the apparent connection between the variations and the theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through and over the whole set another and larger theme ‘goes’ but is not played.” In other words, Elgar varied the typical practice itself of a theme and variation—a common enough compositional practice—by writing a set of variations upon a theme (“its dark saying”) that the listener never really hears. Each variation is instead a counterpoint to that enigmatic theme. Although Elgar said only the composer knew the Enigma melody, plenty of individuals have proposed answers, from a minor version of Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star to a theme presented in Brahms’s Fourth Symphony to Elgar’s own signature E-minor leitmotif. What is known, however, are the variations are representative of his friends. In fact the dedication of the piece reads, “My Friends Pictured Within.” The Nimrod variation is easily the most famous and most often extracted variation of the set, and represents Elgar’s friend, editor, and critic Augustus Jaeger. The name Nimrod is actually a character from the Old Testament, a mighty hunter. In German, Jäger means hunter—which, although seemingly cryptic, makes the connection between the Nimrod variation and Augustus Jaeger clear.

Saturday, February 3, 2018 | 7 – 9pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Living Earth Show: "Revision/s"

Christian Baldini, music director and conductor

Works by Sir Edward Elgar—

Introduction and Allegro
Jolán Friedhoff and Dagenais Smiley, violin
Ellen Ruth Rose, viola, and Susan Lamb Cook, cello

Variations on an Original Theme (“Enigma”), op. 36

For string quartet and string orchestra only, Introduction and Allegro is evocative of a Baroque concerto grosso with demanding, soloistic parts playing with and against a full-sounding string orchestra. The work was composed for a concert of the London Symphony Orchestra in 1905, then in its infancy. The piece is meant to showcase the string-players abilities of the orchestra, and the Allegro section features, in Elgar’s words, a “devil of a fugue.”

Elgar wrote of the Enigma Variations: “Its dark saying must be left unguessed, and I warn you that the apparent connection between the variations and the theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through and over the whole set another and larger theme ‘goes’ but is not played.” In other words, Elgar varied the typical practice itself of a theme and variation—a common enough compositional practice—by writing a set of variations upon a theme (“its dark saying”) that the listener never really hears. Each variation is instead a counterpoint to that enigmatic theme. Although Elgar said only the composer knew the Enigma melody, plenty of individuals have proposed answers, from a minor version of Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star to a theme presented in Brahms’s Fourth Symphony to Elgar’s own signature E-minor leitmotif. What is known, however, are the variations are representative of his friends. In fact the dedication of the piece reads, “My Friends Pictured Within.” The Nimrod variation is easily the most famous and most often extracted variation of the set, and represents Elgar’s friend, editor, and critic Augustus Jaeger. The name Nimrod is actually a character from the Old Testament, a mighty hunter. In German, Jäger means hunter—which, although seemingly cryptic, makes the connection between the Nimrod variation and Augustus Jaeger clear.

Monday, February 5, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Janet Mock

Campus Community Book Project

Janet Mock is a transgender rights activist, TV host and New York Times bestselling author of Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. From People magazine to Entertainment Tonight, to founding the #GirlsLikeUs project and becoming a host for MSNBC, Mock has earned her place as one of the most influential trans women and millennial leaders in American media. She takes the Jackson Hall stage to discuss her career in the keystone event of this year’s Campus Community Book Project.

Q&A Session
Monday, Feb 5 - Jackson Hall - Post-Performance
Janet Mock: Redefining Realness
CAMPUS COMMUNITY BOOK PROJECT
Moderator: Scott Syphax, President, Syphax Strategic Solutions; Host and Co-Executive Producer of Studio Sacramento, on PBS affiliate KVIE.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet

Stephen Hough, piano

The Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet is one of the most remarkable chamber ensembles in the world. Not surprising, since its members are drawn from one of the world’s most renowned orchestras. For this performance, pianist Stephen Hough, known for “the most perfect piano playing conceivable” (The Guardian), accompanies the quintet players in a program featuring Mozart, Barber, Poulenc and a Hough original composition.

Pre-Performance Talk
Wednesday, Feb 7 - Jackson Hall - 7pm
Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet
Stephen Hough in conversation with Don Roth

Friday, February 9, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Bill Charlap Trio with Cécile McLorin Salvant

Somewhere: The Songs of Leonard Bernstein
Mondavi Center Presenting Program
In one of three events celebrating legendary composer Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday, jazz pianist Bill Charlap and longtime trio bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington perform songs from Charlap’s 2004 tribute, Somewhere: The Songs of Leonard Bernstein. Charlap is an acclaimed master of the Great American Songbook, whose inspired reading of Bernstein includes songs from West Side Story, On The Town, Fancy Free and Wonderful Town. Joining the trio onstage is Grammy Award–winning jazz vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant, back for her third consecutive Mondavi Center season.

Pre-Performance Talk
Friday, Feb 9 - Jackson Hall - 7pm
Bill Charlap Trio with Cecile McLorin Salvant
Somewhere: The Songs of Leonard Bernstein
Speaker:  Jeremy Ganter, Associate Executive Director & Director of Programming, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

Uncorked Event  An Uncorked Event, featuring wines from Robert Mondavi Winery.

Sunday, February 11, 2018 | 3 – 5pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Cirque Éloize

Saloon

Theater and circus rambunctiously collide in Saloon, the newest acrobatic creation from contemporary circus troupe Cirque Éloize. Set to live folk and fiddle music, the story starts with a piano tuner setting his sights on the saloon’s beautiful Belle and ends with a chase worthy of the greatest action-packed Westerns of our time. Combining tall tales and original acrobatic choreography, Cirque Éloize expresses its innovative style in a show for the whole family. Hold on to your 10-gallon hats!

Tuesday, February 20, 2018 | 6 – 8pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Open Mic Nights@MC

with CoCo Blossom and DJ Lady Char
Mondavi Center Presenting Program

Singers, Poets & MCs:
Come share your artistry with community!

Sign-ups: 5:30-6PM
Open Mic: 6-9PM

Join us in the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre for a quarterly Open Mic Night. Presented in partnership with campus group Sacramento Area Youth Speaks (SAYS) and the Mondavi Center for UC Davis students and community youth.

Hosted by MC CoCo Blossom with DJ Lady Char. Come ready to perform, support friends or just enjoy the show. No cover charge.

Download a printable flyer here. Share with your friends.

Sponsored by Sacramento Area Youth Speaks (SAYS) and Mondavi Center.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018 | 8 – 10pmMondavi Center for the Performing Arts
Leyla McCalla Trio

As a New York-born Haitian-American living in New Orleans, Leyla McCalla creates music that is steeped in French, Haitian and Creole traditions. A former member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, McCalla—who’s also a pro on the cello, tenor banjo and guitar—ventured out on a solo career to pursue a personal sound. Her latest album, A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey explores issues of social justice and pan-African consciousness, featuring soulful songs sung in English, French and Haitian Creole that are simultaneously fresh, earthy and elegant.

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